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How much does a shed cost?

When researching a new purchase, the first thing we want to know is how much is it going to cost? We go online and search the relevant websites and normally compare the costs of similar items.

It’s no different with a shed. Most likely with your project you have gone to different shed suppliers to get an estimate/quote on your project. Receiving multiple quotes, you notice the prices are varied across the different suppliers, so why is this?

In the below blog we delve into the differences between shed designs and what drives the cost up and down on your shed design.

For a start, many people ask what the m2 rate of a shed is. Fair question, however we always emphasise getting a quote for your site and specific requirements, as a few small changes in spec makes a huge difference. As an example, a 12m x 24m shed that is open front with standard zincalume cladding could be a $74k kitset, vs the same size shed costing $105k with several large doors, paper, clearlight, and coloursteel.

7 common designs and their indicative investment cost

Please note that all Alpine sheds are custom-built taking into account site conditions such as snow and wind loading, therefore, these prices are indicative only and we advise talking to our team to get a full estimate on your project. Estimated figures based on costings in early 2023.

How much does an Alpine shed cost?

Shed 1: 12.0m wide x 19.2m long

  • 4 x 4.8m bays.
  • 3.6m knee - 5.2m apex height.
  • 2 x 3x3m roller doors.
  • 1 x PA door.
  • Zincalume cladding.
  • Guttering, flashings, building paper.

Kitset costing: approx $68,500.00 + GST

Installation with a 100mm concrete floor, add approx $68,500.00 + GST


How much does a lifestyle shed cost?

Shed 2: 12.0m wide x 18.0m long

  • 3 x 6.0m bays.
  • 3.6m knee - 5.2m apex height.
  • 1 x 3.6m x 3.6m roller door.
  • 1 x PA door.
  • Zincalume cladding.
  • Guttering, flashings, building paper.

Kitset costing: approx $64,000.00 + GST

Installation with a 100mm concrete floor, add approx $63,000.00 + GST


Kitset shed prices

Shed 3: 12.0m wide x 24.0m long

  • 4 x 6.0m bays.
  • 5.0m knee - 6.6m apex height.
  • 2 x 4.0m x 4.4m roller doors.
  • 1 x PA door.
  • Zincalume cladding.
  • Guttering, flashings, building paper.

Kitset costing: approx $93,500.00 + GST

Installation with a 100mm concrete floor, add approx $89,000.00 + GST


Price of a kitset shed nz

Shed 4: 15.0m wide x 14.4m long hangar

  • 3 x 4.8m bays.
  • Filled in gable end as shown.
  • 5.0m knee - 6.6m apex height.
  • Zincalume cladding.
  • Guttering & flashings.

Kitset costing: approx $78,000.00 + GST

Installation with a 100mm concrete floor, add approx $60,000.00 + GST


Shed prices NZ

Shed 5: 15.0m wide x 24.0m long

  • 4 x 6.0m bays.
  • 5.0m knee - 6.6m apex height.
  • 2 x 4.0m x 4.4m Roller doors.
  • 1 x PA door.
  • Zincalume cladding.
  • Guttering, flashings, building paper.

Kitset costing: approx $112,000.00 + GST

Installation with a 125mm concrete floor, add approx $104,000.00 + GST


How much does a big shed cost?

Shed 6: 18.0m wide x 30.0m long

  • 5 x 6.0m bays.
  • 5.0m knee - 6.6m apex height.
  • 2 x 5.0m x 4.4m roller doors.
  • 1 x PA door.
  • Zincalume cladding.
  • Guttering, flashings, building paper.

Kitset costing: approx $171,000.00 + GST

Installation with a 125mm concrete floor in 2 bays, add approx $108,000.00 + GST


Farm shed price nz

Shed 7: 20.0m wide x 36.0m long

  • 6 x 6.0m bays.
  • 5.0m knee - 6.6m apex height.
  • 2 x 5.0m x 4.4m roller doors.
  • 1 x PA door.
  • Zincalume cladding.
  • Guttering, flashings, building paper.

Kitset costing: approx $241,000.00 + GST

Installation with a 150mm concrete floor, add approx $210,000.00 + GST


What drives the cost up and down? 

Very few sheds are exactly the same, each has its own use, its own set of requirements, and required customisations. There are many factors that have to be considered when discussing the price of a shed, this means that any one-word answer to the aforementioned question should be taken with a healthy pinch of salt.

Clearspan vs Centrepole

Centrepole sheds are almost always cheaper than clearspan sheds. Whether you want to include a centrepole or not will depend on the use of your shed. If are requiring a large unobstructed workshop area, or are storing vehicles and/or implements, a centrepole will cause more hassle than the money saved by including them. They will seriously limit the usable space inside the shed and lead to greater inefficiencies by slowing down productivity. Centrepoles are also a hazard when shifting vehicles around inside the shed as they can easily be hit, leading to costly damage to your vehicles, equipment, and the shed itself.

Typically, a clearspan shed will always cost more because standard timber can only span a maximum of 6.0m. To span any further than that, a stronger rafter must be used. An LVL laminated timber beam or steel rafter are the only options, and the cost of the materials themselves are higher. When the centrepole is removed and an LVL timber beam or steel rafter is added, often the diameter of the pole itself must be increased to meet engineering requirements which is another added cost.

You can find out more here on the benefits of going clearspan over a centrepole design.

Size of the roller doors and roller door motors

This is an area that is often overlooked. The cost of a roller door is often underestimated and can add a surprisingly large sum of money to the cost of the shed. A standard 3.0m x 3.0m series 1 roller door is the least expensive, however, these are relatively lightweight and limited to a max size of 3.2m x 3.2m high. Series 2 doors are light industrial doors and are the most common, they are usually around 3-4 metres wide and up to 4.7m high. For any larger door, a roller shutter door would be required, these are a heavy-duty industrial-grade door that provides premium durability and security for your shed. While roller shutter doors do cost more, they enable larger openings and are a top-quality door.

Standard roller door motors vary between $500 - $1000 per door, and roller shutter motors start from approx $1500. As you can see, the cost can quickly escalate, especially when multiple doors are required.

Zinc vs Coloursteel vs Coloursteel MAXX Iron Cladding

What you choose for your cladding can make a big impact on the overall cost of your shed. Zincalume iron is the most cost-effective however, some people don’t particularly like the look of it, especially when the shed is situated close to a house. Coloursteel is available in a wide range of colours (see our current colour selection here) and many people feel that it improves the aesthetics of the building.

If you are building within 500m from the coast or an estuary, it is highly likely you will be in an exposure zone and the council will require you to have extra rust protection. This is because the salt-laden wind is highly corrosive and can impact the lifespan of the shed. The council will most likely require your cladding to be upgraded to Coloursteel MAXX which has a protective coating to provide extra protection against corrosive salt-laden wind.

Concrete floor thickness

What thickness of concrete floor you need will depend on what you are storing in the shed.

Typically, a 100mm concrete floor is sufficient for cars and small tractors. For larger tractors, implements, and trucks, a 150mm floor would be required to handle the extra weight. Obviously, more concrete is required for a thicker floor, however there are other costs to be aware of.

The thicker the floor, the heavier grade mesh will be required, placing costs will also increase, and the prep work can take longer as more bracing is often required for the boxing.

A placed 100mm floor can cost around $120 per square meter while a 150mm placed floor can be around $140m2+, this adds up rapidly over a few hundred square metres.

Snow and wind loadings

If you are building a shed in a location with high snow and/or wind loadings, the entire structure will need to be strengthened to accommodate the additional weight and pressure exerted on the building.

Different areas have varying requirements as some locations have higher loadings than others. In some cases, strengthening could be as simple as adding more strap bracing which is inexpensive and relatively easy to do. In other cases, the size of the rafters and all framing need to be increased and often, spacings between purlins and girts need to be decreased to add strength. In extreme wind and snow-prone areas, the size of the bays need to be reduced, this means that the price goes up as more steel rafters, purlins, girts, and poles are required. Reducing the bays also means that timber needs to be cut down from a larger size which results in more wastage.

These changes can also increase labour costs as they take longer to build.

Building in high snow and wind-prone locations can add 10% - 30%+, when compared with a similar-sized shed in a location with standard loadings.

As you can see, a one-size-fits-all approach is simply not an option as there are many factors that can need to be considered. Alpine prefers to run the numbers and design the shed specifically to your individual requirements, location, and building site, so all engineering requirements are met. This means that unexpected costs are not incurred.

Start the process by using our shed builder tool.Use our online shed builder

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